A Japanese Thoreau of the Twelfth Century (14)


英訳方丈記

  • Chapter 1
  • Chapter 2
  • Chapter 3
  • Chapter 4
  • Chapter 5
  • Chapter 6
  • Chapter 7
  • Chapter 8
  • Chapter 9
  • Chapter 10
  • Chapter 11
  • Chapter 12
  • Chapter 13
  • Chapter 14
  • Chapter 15
  • Chapter 16

  • CHAPTER 14

     

    When I first came to this place I did not intend to stay long, but now I have dwelt here these five years. My cabin has weathered with the course of time, the eaves are loaded with dead leaves, the ground it stands on is green with moss. From time to time news of what takes place in City-Royal reaches me in my solitude, and I hear continually of the deaths of persons of importance; of smaller men who disappear the roll is endless. I hear, too, of houses burnt down in numbers, but my humble cabin remains a safe shelter for me. 'T is cramped, indeed, but it has a bed for me to sleep on at night, and a mat to sit on during the day, so I have no reason to be discontented. The hermit-crab is satisfied with a narrow shell for its home, which shows that it knows its own nature; the osprey dwells on high crags because it fears man. So is it with me. A man who knows himself and also the world he lives in has nothing to ask for, no society to long for; he aims only at a quiet life, and makes his happiness in freedom from annoyance. But those who live in the world, what do they do ? They build mansions, but not for their own pleasure; 't is for their wives and families, for their relatives and friends, for their masters or teachers, or to store their property, or to house cattle and horses. Now I have built my cabin for myself, not for any other man. And why have I done so ? As the world now goes I find no congenial minds in it, not even a servant to trust to. What profit, then, were a larger house to me ? whom should I invite to it ? whom could I take into it to
    serve me P One usually seeks the friendship of rich men,and thinks most of public personages; men of good hearts and honest souls are not sought after. More wisely, I make friends of lutes and flutes. One who serves another is apt to be always thinking of rewards and punishments, he hankers after favours, and is not content with more good treatment and kindness and the peace that ensuetb. To me, then, it seems better to be one's own master and one's own servant. If there is something to be done I prefer to use my own body to do it. This may be bothersome, but easier than to see that other folk do it for you. If I have to walk, I walk ; it means some toil, but less than that of looking after horses or carriages. In one body I possess two servants: my hands do what I want, and my feet bear me where I would go—both serve me just as I desire them. Again, my mind knows exactly what the body has to endure, so it lets it rest when tired, and does not task it save when fresh and vigorous. And when it does use the body it does not abuse it, nor would the mind be put out by the body being sometimes in a dull mood. And besides, plenty of exercise and plenty of work are good for the body; too much idleness is had for the body. In addition, to impose s burden upon another man, to constrain his will, is a sinful thing—we have no right to take possession of another' powers.

     

    大かた此所に住みそめし時は、あからさまとおもひしかど、今ま(すイ)でに五とせを經たり。假の庵もやゝふる屋となりて、軒にはくちばふかく、土居に苔むせり。おのづから事のたよりに都を聞けば、この山にこもり居て後、やごとなき人の、かくれ給へるもあまた聞ゆ。ましてその數ならぬたぐひ、つくしてこれを知るべからず。たびたびの炎上にほろびたる家、またいくそばくぞ。たゞかりの庵のみ、のどけくしておそれなし。ほどせばしといへども、夜臥す床あり、ひる居る座あり。一身をやどすに不足なし。がうなはちひさき貝をこのむ、これよく身をしるによりてなり。みさごは荒磯に居る、則ち人をおそるゝが故なり。我またかくのごとし。身を知り世を知れらば、願はずまじらはず、たゞしづかなるをのぞみとし、うれへなきをたのしみとす。すべて世の人の、すみかを作るならひ、かならずしも身のためにはせず。或は妻子眷屬のために作り、或は親昵朋友のために作る。或は主君、師匠および財寳、馬牛のためにさへこれをつくる。我今、身のためにむすべり、人のために作らず。ゆゑいかんとなれば、今の世のならひ、この身のありさま、ともなふべき人もなく、たのむべきやつこもなし。たとひ廣く作れりとも、誰をかやどし、誰をかすゑむ。それ人の友たるものは富めるをたふとみ、ねんごろなるを先とす。かならずしも情あると、すぐなるとをば愛せず、たゞ絲竹花月を友とせむにはしかじ。人のやつこたるものは賞罰のはなはだしきを顧み、恩の厚きを重くす。更にはごくみあはれぶといへども、やすく閑なるをばねがはず、たゞ我が身を奴婢とするにはしかず。もしなすべきことあれば、すなはちおのづから身をつかふ。たゆからずしもあらねど、人をしたがへ、人をかへりみるよりはやすし。もしありくべきことあれば、みづから歩む。くるしといへども、馬鞍牛車と心をなやますにはしか(二字似イ)ず。今ひと身をわかちて。二つの用をなす。手のやつこ、足ののり物、よくわが心にかなへり。心また身のくるしみを知れゝば、くるしむ時はやすめつ、まめなる時はつかふ。つかふとてもたびたび過さず、ものうしとても心をうごかすことなし。いかにいはむや、常にありき、常に働(動イ)くは、これ養生なるべし。なんぞいたづらにやすみ居らむ。人を苦しめ人を惱ますはまた罪業なり。いかゞ他の力をかるべき。

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    「A Japanese Thoreau of the Twelfth Century」は『南方熊楠全集 第10巻 』に所収。
    『方丈記』原文は青空文庫より。




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